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A glass and a half full of joy.

George Cadbury

George Cadbury was born in Edgbaston in 1839. His father (John Cadbury) was poor and therefore George's education did not reach its full potential. However, George then joined in their family business. He and his older brother ran the Cadbury's factory together. Their factory was renamed to "Bournville Factory". The Cadbury's made their very first milk chocolate in 1897. As time went by, they tweaked the recipe until they began to use fresh full cream milk in their chocolate which made the famoush "milk chocolate bar" we all know today. George Cadbury passed away on the 24th October, 1922 at Northfield Manor.


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General Background Information of Chocolate:

If it weren't for the ancient Aztec and Maya civilizations of Central America, the chocolate many of us know and love, in this case "Cadbury's" would simply not exist. Cocoa, AKA Chocolate comes from the Cocoa bean



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Cocoa Tree



A Glass and a Half Full Productions

In 2007, Cadbury started "A Glass and a half full Productions" responsible for Cadburys TV commercials. Their first commercial - featuring a Gorilla playing drums to the sound of Phil Collins song "In The Air Tonight" - was a phenomenon. The 90 second commercial was first aired on Friday 31 August 2007 during the finale of Big Brother (series 8). The video received 500,000 hits on youtube in the first week, escalating to over 10 million online views. The advert won an array of awards- Campaign of the Year by Campaign Magazine, Best TV Commercial of the Year at the British Television Advertising Awards, World’s Best Ad at the prestigious Cannes Lions International Adverting Award, and Grand Prix award, beating more than 4,000 short listed entries. Alongside the advert, Cadburys ran billboard and print campaigns ad and following its success in the UK, the commercial went overseas to Canada, Australia, South Africa and New Zealand. The Gorilla ad was followed by a cute commercial featuring quirky airport trucks racing in a deserted runway – this was launched in March 2008.

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A Glass and a Half Full Productions

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The drumming gorilla

In 2007, Cadbury started "A Glass and a half full Productions" responsible for Cadburys TV commercials. Their first commercial - featuring a Gorilla playing drums to the sound of Phil Collins song "In The Air Tonight" - was a phenomenon. The 90 second commercial was first aired on Friday 31 August 2007 during the finale of Big Brother (series 8). The video received 500,000 hits on youtube in the first week, escalating to over 10 million online views. The advert won an array of awards- Campaign of the Year by Campaign Magazine, Best TV Commercial of the Year at the British Television Advertising Awards, World’s Best Ad at the prestigious Cannes Lions International Adverting Award, and Grand Prix award, beating more than 4,000 short listed entries. Alongside the advert, Cadburys ran billboard and print campaigns ad and following its success in the UK, the commercial went overseas to Canada, Australia, South Africa and New Zealand. The Gorilla ad was followed by a cute commercial featuring quirky airport trucks racing in a deserted runway – this was launched in March 2008. The ad campaign was aired at the same time as the problems at Heathrow's Terminal 5 with baggage handling; in the advert baggage was scattered across the runway.

One we know many of you will have seen recently is Cadbury’s comical - yet rather odd – commercial “The Eyebrow Children.” The advert features two children sitting in a bland photographer’s studio. When the photographer leaves to answer the phone, the tune of “Don’t Stop the Rock” by Freestyle Express begins, and the children move their eyebrows in a series of synchronised movements. Like the majority of the Glass and a Half Full productions, the advert features no mention or sight of chocolate until the very end where the bar is pictured with Cadburys slogan “A Glass and a half full of joy.” Thus, many people then view the adverts as pointless, but with the kind of web exposure their commercials experienced and the word-of-mouth talk they generate, they definitely cut through the advertising “noise” and get noticed. Perhaps these commercials play on embedding “Cadburys” into our sub-conscience. I would say "A Glass And A Half Full Prodcutions" appeal to all age groups - there quirky charm and sheer oddity makes everyone with a remote sense of humour at least smile. The videos can be sent from one teenager to their 100s of contacts or from one adult to their friends and famly - Cadbury benefits greatly from this kind of publicity.
'How Wonderfully Odd'
In an era where e-mailing and instant messaging are a part of so many people lives, a commercial designed to get noticed as a great video (and not necessarily to do with the product) – one that people will want to send around, and will want to watch over and over again - is a fantastic marketing idea. The 3 videos are the only ones from “A Glass And A Half Productions” to be produced so far, but Cadburys do tend to run along the theme in other commericals also, of something a little unusual. The new advert for Cadbury’s Clusters features a troop of people dressed as santas, marching through a public park in the height of summer – ending with the slogan “How wonderfully odd.” This further demonstrates the odd and random angle that Cadbury takes to allow their adverts to be noticed over other marketing competition.

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Factory Visits

1902- The Cadburys Factory opened a section to alow their adoring fans and fellow chocolate lovers to come and visit the place where all the magic happens. The factory tour was an effective way of advertising their chocolate to the world. The factory visits included a tour around the factory and surrounding village.

In 1938 150,000 had taken part in the Cadburys factory tours. Mr Cadbury himeself even joined in many of the tours, walking with the visitors and giving out flowers to the "Mother's Union members" and "Women's Institute". The Factory tours were very popular and therefore were a huge success for Cadbury.

The factory tour lasts around 1 hour and 30 minutes. Normally visitors spend about 3 hours to take in the whole Cadbury experiance. There are many activities avaliable on the tour, such as: a Cadbury ride, play park, shops, demonstrations of chocolate skills which if you feel like having a go, you can! and much much more for visitors to enjoy.
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Cadbury Dairy Milk: Advertisments Through the Years


Part 1: The 'glass and a half' Phenomenon


Cadbury Dairy Milk first hit the UK shelves in 1905, but proper investment into the advertising of the product was not impleme
Dairy Milk Advertisment
Dairy Milk Advertisment
nted until 1928. The very first advertisements always mentioned the products ‘nutty flavour’ and it being ‘rich in cream’, and by 1928 it was the biggest selling chocolate product on the UK high street.

The iconic ‘glass and a half’ measure of milk made Cadbury Dairy Milk one of the most recognizable brands out there. The simple and recognizable slogan found itself accompanying the Dairy Milk product on its wrappers and TV ads. It is still here today and has made Cadbury’ Dairy Milk known worldwide.

This 1928 advertisement shows the image the glass and a half milk measurement being poured on to the chocolate bar. This is to show that the bar is made of a glass and a half of milk. The product and advert were supposed to highlight the fact that the chocolate was nutritional.

'Eat More Milk' was used in this advert to show that milk was included in this product - the use of milk was highlighted significantly as milk is a healthy drink and using milk to advertise their product was a way of making their product sound like a healthy food choice.

The target audience of the product is all ages, but it would probably be more aimed at adults as they are the ones who would decide whether their children are to eat the chocolate. The nutritional side of the product would have convinced more people to buy it.


Cadbury Dairy Milk Wrappers Over the Years
Cadbury Dairy Milk Wrappers Over the Years



Cadburys Dairy Milk Chocolate - A glass and a half in every half pound/Award yourself the CDM
Cadbury's Creme Egg - How do you eat yours?
Cadbury's Fruit and Nut - Are you a Cadbury's Fruit & Nut case?
Cadbury's Milk Tray - And all because the lady loves Milk Tray.
Cadbury's Roses - Roses grow on you
Cadbury's Drinking Chocolate - Hot chocolate, drinking chocolate - the late, late drink
Cadbury's Flake - Sixpence worth of Heaven


Cadbury India


Cadbury’s Dairy Milk started in Bourneville in the UK in 1905, but the journey with true chocoholics started in India 43 years later. Cadbury’s has been the number one market leader in chocolate sales for years. Cadbury’s has claimed that it has been the source of every Indian’s moment of happiness, joy and celebration – whether this is true, it’s doubtful. To this day, ‘Cadbury Dairy Milk’ alone has a 30% value share in the Indian chocolate market.
In the early 90’s, indulgent chocolates were only seen as a child’s heavenly dream - only rewarded for good behaviour, or perhaps even for a bribe. However, in the mid 90’s a new campaign was released, (‘The Real Taste of Life’) re-defining the outlook from “just for kids” to the “kids in all of us”. This new campaign brought out the forgotten child in every adult, flushing back memories of the very first moment they tasted chocolate. Cadbury Dairy Milk soon became the ideal expression of “’spontaneity’” and “’shared good feels’”.

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Cadbury India



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Interactive Creme Egg Bus Shelters



In January 2009, Cadbury launched a new advertising scheme to promote “Creme Eggs”. Located in
London, Birmingham, Glasgow, Manchester, Nottingham, Sheffield and York, these bus shelters will feature a digital screen in which members of the public may play the game. The aim of the game is simple - players must bash as many eggs as possible in 20 seconds. I think its a great idea - by playing into one of the most obvious times of boredom - waiting for a bus - Cadbury can make more of an impact than a still advert which can be so easily ignored.






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Cadbury Advertising Timeline

1867

Cadbury Cocoa Essence began advertising. They highlighted the purity of the product with the slogan ‘Absolutely pure, therefore best’.

1900

Cadbury gained the help of a popular artist Cecil Aldin to create a series of posters and press adverts to advertise their products.

1920s-30s

Cadbury promoted their products through the war by creating the ‘Chocolate Mystery Man’ character. He gave out free gifts, but only if he could be found.

1928

Cadbury Dairy Milk poster campaigns began using the iconic ‘glass and half’ slogan and image to stress its high milk content.

1930s

Cadbury’s status as the nation’s favorite brand becomes the most important feature of the company’s advertising.

1938

150,000 people went on the factory tour every year. It began in 1902 to link people more closely with Cadbury.

1939

During the 2nd World War Cadbury Dairy Milk disappeared. Cocoa and chocolate was under government restriction and only rationed chocolate was sold.

1951

‘The Bournville Story’, a film promoting Cadbury, was made and shown cinemas around the country.

1955

Cadbury Drinking Chocolate was one of the very first ads on commercial television in this year.

1957

Cadbury commissioned thirteen one-minute films shown as TV adverts. These ads described the harvesting of the Cadbury chocolate ingredient.

1959/60

Flake TV advertising began; it used the iconic theme of a woman sensually enjoying a bar of chocolate on her own.

1970-1974

Memorable television ads raised the sales of Cadbury Fruit & Nut and Whole Nuts by 73% (‘Everyone’s a Fruit & Nut Case’, ‘NUTS whole hazel nuts’).

1983

The Wispa Bar launched including televised ad campaigns featuring comedians and comic actors talking about the new bar.

1990

Cadbury World opened a £10 million replacement for factory tours. 350,000 people visited in the first year.

1996

Cadbury began a £10 million annual sponsorship of Coronation Street, reaching an audience of eighteen million people.

2007

The Cadbury ‘Gorilla’ ad premiered, immediately becoming one of the most popular adverts in recent years.



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Cadbury’s Christmas Club advertisement poster - 1935


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Up until the year 1928, not a lot of money was put in to the advertising of the products. By this year Cadbury’s was the best selling chocolate company in Britain. The “Join our Christmas club for Cadbury’s chocolates” poster is from the year 1935.

The advert has Santa Claus on it, by using Santa Clause it means that the poster will appeal to children a lot more than it would if Santa was not included in the poster, the idea is that children will see santa in the poster and then want the chocolate for christmas. In the poster there is also several cadbury’s products being shown, this means that many of the products are being promoted rather that just one it also shows the variety that Cadbury’s sells. The writing on the Poster says “JOIN OUR
CHRISTMAS CLUB FOR CADBURY’S CHOCOLATES”. Notice how all of the letters are in capitals and the words “Christmas Club” and “Cadbury’s” are larger than the rest of the words to make them stand out so that attention is drawn to those words more than the others.

The target audience for this poster would be everyone. The santa clause image makes the poster attractive to children the bright colours may also attract the attention of youngsters, and the fancy and attractive packaging of the boxes of chocolates would appeal to adults as the packaging looks attractive and it may appeal as a nice Christmas present for adults to buy for eachother.

I think the message behind this poster advertising Cadbury’s Dairy Milk Chocolate is that, By using Santa in the poster it promotes the idea of Cadbury’s Chocolate being a product that you could give away as a Christmas present, also because Santa clause is such an iconic figure to children, if I child sees a poster with Santa on it they will immediately be intrigued to know what the poster is about therefore I think the message of this poster is that you should buy this product because santa likes it, so you will like it to.

This advert is dramatically different from the most recent adverts shown on T.V and in poster form. The advert is much more old fashioned, naturally, compared to the adverts which are produced now a days by Cadbury’s. The colours used in the modern posters are very bright and attractive the “Cadbury’s Colour” is purple so there tends to be a purple theme throughout all of the posters and adverts where as in the early days of Cadbury’s this wasn’t particularly the case, also in the latest adverts there tends to be a slogan or jingle but in some of the earlier promotions of the products there was no catchy slogan.

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